Triad Brilliant, Passaic River Hills

Current and Upcoming Exhibitions

Summer 2015

Recent Acquisitions
May 5–August 9, 2015

Mabel Dwight, "The Ocean, Coney Island," 1928, lithograph. Purchased with funds provided by Family and Friends in Honor of Barbara Palmer, 2014.8. Mabel Dwight, The Ocean, Coney Island, 1928, lithograph. Purchased with funds provided by Family and Friends in Honor of Barbara Palmer, 2014.8.

With this installment of Recent Acquisitions, the Palmer Museum of Art offers a selection of American and European prints that range more than four centuries in date. The earliest is a full-page woodcut, titled The Last Judgment, which was once bound in the Nuremberg Chronicle, published by Anton Koberger in 1493. Other Old Master prints include a posthumous portrait of the German printmaker Heinrich Aldegrever by Simon Frisius, one of Marcantonio Raimondi’s audacious engravings after Albrecht Dürer, and a woodcut depicting Christ carrying his cross from Sebald Beham’s 1521 Passion series. Two closely related views of pre-Haussmann Paris, representing distinct factions of the etching revival in France, complement a pair of intaglios of a Nova Scotia inn executed two years apart by American etching revivalist Stephen Parrish. A bit of humor is added to the exhibition with a couple of early nineteenth-century caricatures of the British royal family by Charles Williams and George Cruikshank and a lithograph depicting a crowded Coney Island beach drawn by Mabel Dwight in 1928.

 

Flora and Fauna
May 19–August 16, 2015

Pancrace Bessa, Hyacinthus Orientalis, c. 1816–22, watercolor on vellum. Presented in Memory of James Rea Maxwell Jr., 1921, 74.4.Pancrace Bessa, Hyacinthus Orientalis, c. 1816–22, watercolor on vellum. Presented in Memory of James Rea Maxwell Jr., 1921, 74.4.

Although the practice of illustrating natural history extends back several thousand years—Pliny the Elder tells us that the ancient Greeks regularly decorated their treatises on medicinal botanicals with drawings of key specimens—the precise rendition of flora and fauna dates only to the eighteenth century, when the codification of scientific methods begun in the previous century laid the foundation for increscently accurate imagery of the natural world.

Selected from the Palmer Museum of Art’s permanent collection as well as from two local private collections, this exhibition features some of the era’s most celebrated artists, from the floral specialists Pierre Joseph Redouté and Pancrace Bessa to John James Audubon, American naturalist extraordinaire, and his British counterpart, John Gould, whose Birds of Europe offered a creditable response to Audubon’s magnificent Birds of America. Also on view are numerous earlier examples of flora and fauna, including several sheets from an early sixteenth-century Flemish Book of Hours, lavishly decorated with readily identifiable flowers, birds, and insects; illustrations of imaginary animals from a seventeenth-century book on the Americas; and a page from Jacob Meydenbach’s 1491 Hortus Sanitatis, or Garden of Health, bearing woodcut vignettes of beasts and herbs that even in the fifteenth century were likely considered to be of dubious efficacy as curatives.

 

Luminous Allure: Studio Glass from the Collection of Audrey and Norbert Gaelen
June 23–August 16, 2015

Dale Chihuly, Cobalt Blue Seaform Set, c. 1994, blown glass. Gift of Audrey and Norbert Gaelen, 2013.39.Dale Chihuly, Cobalt Blue Seaform Set, c. 1994, blown glass. Gift of Audrey and Norbert Gaelen, 2013.39.

Audrey and Norbert (’47 Engineering) Gaelen have been acquiring studio glass for nearly a quarter of a century. Although passionate about collecting, they take equal delight in sharing their treasures with others. This summer, the Palmer will showcase fifty pieces of glass from the Gaelen collection, including several works recently gifted by the couple to the museum.

Among the artists represented in the Gaelen collection is the so-called “father” of the studio glass movement, Harvey Littleton, and arguably his most famous student, Dale Chihuly, who is represented by several works, including an extravagantly baroque “piccolo Venetian,” made in homage to the centuries-old Venetian glass tradition that proved so inspirational for the artist. Fittingly, Venetian master Lino Tagliapietra—another pioneering master of the medium—is represented by several spectacular works.

Objects of dazzling variety will be on view, among them the filet de verre (glass thread) bowls of Toots Zynsky; elegant paraphrases of ancient forms and motifs by Dante Marioni, Preston Singletary, and William Morris; and sensuous, multicolored vessels by Marvin Lipofsky, Stephen Rolfe Powell, and Deanna Clayton. The pursuit of glass as autonomous sculptural form will be amply evident in the work of Therman Statom, Howard Ben Tré, Mary Shaffer, Dorothy Hafner, and Kjell Engman.

Luminous Allure will highlight these and many other splendid pieces from the Gaelens’ outstanding private collection of studio glass. Visitors will no doubt delight in this impressive, shimmering array of unique works by early innovators in the field as well as prominent artists working in glass today.

 

Fall 2015

Mining the Store II: American Drawings and Watercolors from the Permanent Collection
August 25–December 13, 2015

Hiram Draper Williams, Untitled Illustration for a Film on Racial Segregation, c. 1950, pen and ink with wash and watercolor. Gift of Betty and Edward Mattil, 91.170.Hiram Draper Williams, Untitled Illustration for a Film on Racial Segregation, c. 1950, pen and ink with wash and watercolor. Gift of Betty and Edward Mattil, 91.170.

In revisiting the idea behind last year’s Mining the Store exhibition, the Palmer Museum of Art has once again delved the depths of the permanent collection to retrieve a number of drawings and watercolors by American artists that have not been on view in quite some time. Works by familiar figures, among them Reginald Marsh, David Levine, and David Burliuk, are coupled with marvelous images by individuals whose names may have not yet been encountered by most museum visitors.

 

 

 

You Have to See This: Abstract Art from the Permanent Collection
September 1–December 6, 2015

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1968–69, woodcut in cadmium red, 69.7. Donald Judd, Untitled, 1968–69, woodcut in cadmium red, 69.7.

In the world of digital reproduction, it is increasingly difficult to understand the ways in which many works of art require direct viewing in order to be understood. Compiled and researched by Penn State students, this exhibition showcases the myriad ways in which abstract art can, through material and formal means, pose radical questions about the nature of imagery itself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Archipenko: A Modern Legacy
September 22–December 13, 2015

Archipenko: A Modern Legacy is a major retrospective of the work of a pioneering figure in the history of modern sculpture. Active in European avant-garde circles in the early decades of the twentieth century, Alexander Archipenko revolutionized and reinvigorated sculpture by reintroducing color, incorporating negative space, and integrating mixed media. 

Organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington, D.C., in collaboration with the Frances Archipenko Gray Collection and the Archipenko Foundation.

 

Spring 2016

Small Prints, Big Artists: Renaissance and Baroque Masterpieces from Carnegie Museum of Art
February 2–May 15, 2016

 

 

Previous Exhibitions

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